Archive for the ‘Fundraising’ Category

WEEKLY NEWS DIGEST (March 3-9, 2014)

Monday, March 10th, 2014

FUNDRAISING

Oregon State University raises $1.01 billion — well ahead of schedule.” By Betsy Hammond. Oregonian. March 4, 2014.

WEEKLY NEWS DIGEST (February 24-March 2, 2014)

Monday, March 3rd, 2014

FUNDRAISING

Telemarketers for Charities Pull in Record Amount in New York; The “Pennies for Charity” report showed telemarketing firms raised a record $249.3 million in 2012.” By Melanie Grayce West. Wall Street Journal. February 27, 2014.

“Cookies for Kids’ Cancer fights for the vulnerable; Gretchen Witt’s bake sales have raised $8M for pediatric cancers.” By Irina Ivanova. Crain’s New York Business. February 27, 2014.

WEEKLY NEWS DIGEST (August 26-September 1, 2013)

Monday, September 2nd, 2013

FUNDRAISING

Clinton Foundation includes whole family in fund-raising.” By Philip Rucker and Tom Hamburger. Washington Post. August 31, 2013.

WEEKLY NEWS DIGEST (August 5-11, 2013)

Monday, August 12th, 2013

FUNDRAISING

A ‘Philanthropunk’ on Potty Humor; John Kluge Hosts His First Party for Toilet Hackers.” By Marshall Heyman. Wall Street Journal. August 6, 2013.

WEEKLY NEWS DIGEST (July 15-21, 2013)

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

FUNDRAISING

A Donation Deal Goes Awry.” By Chuck Klosterman. New York Times. July 19, 2013.

WEEKLY NEWS DIGEST (June 17-23, 2013)

Monday, June 24th, 2013

FUNDRAISING

The Trouble With Kickstarter; The only thing worse than having to watch your friend’s arty movie is having to pay for it, too; the crowdfunding backlash.” By Ellen Gamerman. Wall Street Journal. June 21, 2013.

WEEKLY NEWS DIGEST (May 6-12, 2013)

Monday, May 13th, 2013

FUNDRAISING

A Fund-Raiser’s Finale.” By Robin Pogrebin. New York Times. May 5, 2013. There are many artists at Lincoln Center. Reynold Levy, president of the performing arts center, likes to think of himself as one of them. His art is putting the arm on donors, and he is acknowledged to be one of the very best nudges in New York. “I’ve asked everyone for money,” Mr. Levy said in an interview. “They hide behind pillars when they see me.” The personal letter. The luncheon confab. The pure play to vanity. These are among Mr. Levy’s tools. The gala, he writes in his 2009 fund-raising guide, “Yours for the Asking,” gives men and women “an excuse to wear those new cuff links and display that new gown.” “To see and be seen doing some good is a form of public recognition most people cherish,” he continues. “Don’t let them tell you otherwise.” Now in the fund-raising finale to close out his 11 years at Lincoln Center, he has set out to raise more than $8 million for the annual spring gala on Thursday, which will honor him as he prepares to depart in December. The amount would be a record for a gala at Lincoln Center and among the higher sums ever raised for an event by a New York City cultural organization.

WEEKLY NEWS DIGEST (April 8-15, 2013)

Tuesday, April 16th, 2013

FUNDRAISING

Aiding Sobriety, a Chord at a Time.” By James C. McKinley. New York Times. April 11, 2013. It’s about 1,700 miles from Madison Square Garden to Willoughby Bay in Antigua, and it is hard to imagine two places more different than the grimy canyons of Midtown Manhattan and the pristine, windswept hills overlooking the Caribbean that are home to the Crossroads Center drug rehabilitation clinic. But this weekend the two places will be linked by Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival, which raises money for this small nonprofit treatment center, which he has built into a $20 million charity over the last 15 years, largely through selling his guitars and persuading friends to do benefit concerts. Like the previous three Crossroads festivals, the two-day event at Madison Square Garden will be a celebration of blues and blues-rock guitar, anchored by Robert Cray and his band, Los Lobos and the Allman Brothers Band. The lineup includes about 30 musicians, most of them, like Mr. Clapton, masters of the electric blues: B. B. King, Buddy Guy, Jimmie Vaughan, Albert Lee and Jeff Beck. The gathering is daunting, even for veterans on the bill. It’s about 1,700 miles from Madison Square Garden to Willoughby Bay in Antigua, and it is hard to imagine two places more different than the grimy canyons of Midtown Manhattan and the pristine, windswept hills overlooking the Caribbean that are home to the Crossroads Center drug rehabilitation clinic. But this weekend the two places will be linked by Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival, which raises money for this small nonprofit treatment center, which he has built into a $20 million charity over the last 15 years, largely through selling his guitars and persuading friends to do benefit concerts. Like the previous three Crossroads festivals, the two-day event at Madison Square Garden will be a celebration of blues and blues-rock guitar, anchored by Robert Cray and his band, Los Lobos and the Allman Brothers Band. The lineup includes about 30 musicians, most of them, like Mr. Clapton, masters of the electric blues: B. B. King, Buddy Guy, Jimmie Vaughan, Albert Lee and Jeff Beck. The gathering is daunting, even for veterans on the bill.

WEEKLY NEWS DIGEST (February 11-17, 2013)

Monday, February 18th, 2013

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WEEKLY NEWS DIGEST (December 31, 2012-January 6, 2013)

Monday, January 7th, 2013

FUNDRAISING

Christmas tree recycling a fundraising opportunity for nonprofits in Portland metro area.” By Sara Hottman. Oregonian. December 30, 2012. The Boy Scouts yelled “tree” through the icy wind each time a truck pulled up to their collection site Sunday to drop off a Christmas tree.Between donations, the boys of Troop 707 made a wind-blocking fort in the back of a large trailer where trees were stacked high, said Colby Lawson, 11. There’s all sorts of nooks and passages through the branches, he said. “It’s fun to play in the trees.” Oregon is the nation’s top Christmas tree producer and recycler. While many millions of the 7 million trees harvested each year are shipped nationally and internationally, the area’s nonprofits each year use Christmas tree recycling as a way to raise money and keep waste out of landfills, says the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Trees are biodegradable, but still produce harmful methane gas as they decompose in landfills, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Recycle your tree To find a nonprofit recycling Christmas trees near you, visit Metro’s Find a Recycler page and search “Christmas trees.” Troop 707 is one of nearly 70 organizations — including 40 Boy and Girl Scout troops — across the Portland metro area capping the holidays with a Christmas tree recycling fundraiser. They take a small fee in exchange for recycling Christmas trees as mulch, habitat, or fuel. Most groups have trees composted or mulched. Some, like Tualatin Valley Trout Unlimited, collect Christmas trees each year for a coho salmon habitat enhancement project on the Necanicum River. Christmas tree recycling and mulching to raise money is a fast-growing trend nationwide, according to the National Christmas Tree Association. Portland Organic Productions, a North Portland nonprofit, for the first time this year is collecting Christmas trees to turn into mulch for plantings in the neighborhood and for people in the area, said Anisha Scanlon, founder of the organization. Money raised will support the organization’s St. Johns Main Street Clean Up initiative.